boon-dog-gle: (noun) work of little or no value done merely to keep or look busy.
free: (adjective) provided without, or not subject to, a charge or payment.

1/27/06

gotta be quick about it though...

I believe in sin and that people are sinners. I even believe in 'total depravity', which doesn't mean I believe people are as evil as they possibly could be, but rather that they (and I) are affected by a propensity for sin and selfishness in every aspect of our lives--our thinking, emotions, actions, motivations, etc. This is obviously a philosophical or theological viewpoint. Yet, I think it is perhaps the most impirically verifiable 'metaphysical' claim that one could make. Not only can we point to a whole human history worth of war, atrocity, prejudice, class-warfare, oppression, and the insurance industry. But just think about your own life (as I do mine) and the one person or few people you love the most--maybe your spouse, parent, child, friend, sibling--and think how many times a day you act selfishly toward them, or hold a grudge against them when you perceive you've been slighted. And, of course, if you consider the standard Jesus affirmed as the test of goodness--loving God with all your heart, soul, mind and strength--probably none of could say we even approach such a goal for a full minute out of the year.

With all that said, it's weird how when I go to my favorite coffee shop or the St. Louis Bread Co. (today's choice) to work/study, I feel free to leave my computer on the table when I need to go take care of personal business. I see other people do the same. And I've never had anything stolen yet. My theology says I will regret this habit one day. But for now, I'm grateful that human nature and 'nature calling' have not combined forces to rob me of my computer.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

I think that's what some call living dangerously! ;-)

- Steve

W Sofield said...

I agree with Steve. I would be very cautious about getting up to get a napkin from across the room. Maybe that's just me.

G.K. Chesterton...

"The Bible tells us to love our neighbors, and also to love our enemies; probably because they are generally the same people."